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Following Ubiquiti’s security incident and its subsequent recommendation to change your router password and enable multi-factor authentication, and the fact that it is widely reported that using default passwords on routers while working from home is a security risk, we thought it would be helpful to remind you to change your router password sooner rather than later.

Security experts have warned us for years that our wireless routers are an easy gateway for hackers to get into our systems, and that the manufacturer’s default passwords on routers are freely accessible on the Internet. Therefore, it is important to change your router’s password to a unique security password from the default password when you set up your router.

To assist, Lifewire has a tutorial that is easy to follow and can be accessed here.

Please note Lifewire’s caution of not using the same password for your router as you do for your WiFi. They should be separate and distinct from each other. Limiting access to your WiFi is also important for data security.

While it looks like the work from-home model will continue, implementing these security measures is important for the protection of our data on both personal and professional levels.

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You probably heard about the recent hack of Twitter accounts that took place on July 15, 2020. The hackers took over several prominent Twitter accounts, which resulted in a scam that netted over $118,000 in bitcoin for the hackers. One of the most startling things about the cyberattack was that it was led by a 17-year-old along with his accomplices. The hackers took over the accounts of well-known individuals including Barack Obama, Kim Kardashian West, Kanye West, Bill Gates, Elon Musk and many others, and tweeted a “double your bitcoin scam” from these Twitter accounts directing people to send bitcoin to fraudulent accounts.

The New York Department of Financial Services (NYDFS) issued a detailed report last week regarding this hack into the social media giant. The report found that “the Twitter Hack happened in three phases: (1) social engineering attacks to gain access to Twitter’s network; (2) taking over accounts with desirable usernames (or “handles”) and selling access to them; and (3) taking over dozens of high-profile Twitter accounts and trying to trick people into sending the Hackers bitcoin. All this happened in roughly 24 hours.”

How did the hackers do it? According to the report, the first phase of the attack started with the hackers stealing credentials of Twitter employees the old-fashioned way by using social engineering. The hackers posed as Twitter IT employees and contacted several Twitter employees claiming there was a problem with Twitter’s Virtual Private Network (VPN). The report stated that the “hackers claimed they were responding to a reported problem the employee was having with Twitter’s Virtual Private Network (VPN). Since switching to remote working, VPN problems were common at Twitter. The Hackers then tried to direct the employee to a phishing website that looked identical to the legitimate Twitter VPN website and was hosted by a similarly named domain. As the employee entered their credentials into the phishing website, the Hackers would simultaneously enter the information into the real Twitter website. This false log-in generated an MFA [multi-factor authentication] notification requesting that the employees authenticate themselves, which some of the employees did.”

The hackers then went surfing within the Twitter system looking for employees with access to internal tools to take over accounts. This led to the second phase of the attack: taking over and selling access to original gangster (OG) Twitter accounts. According to the report, an OG Twitter account refers to accounts  designated by a single word, letter, or number and adopted by Twitter’s early users. The hackers discussed taking over and selling the OG accounts in various online chat messages. On July 15, the hackers “ hijacked multiple OG Twitter accounts and tweeted screenshots of one of the internal tools from some of the accounts to the accounts’ respective followers.

The final phase of the hack involved  taking over various cryptocurrency company accounts and directing users to a link to a scam bitcoin address. According to a tweet sent out by Twitter on July 16, approximately 130 accounts of high-profile verified users (those Twitter accounts that you see with the blue check mark) were taken over by the hackers with tweets asking people to send bitcoin, with the promise that the high-profile user would double the amount to be given to a charity. The bitcoin address was fraudulent, the tweets were not sent by the actual users, and the hackers were able to collect more than $118,000 in bitcoin.

The NYDFS began its investigation because the cryptocurrency companies are regulated entities. According to the report, the department instructed the cryptocurrency companies to block the hackers’ bitcoin addresses if they hadn’t already done so. This move prevented over a million dollars’ worth of fraudulent bitcoin transfers.

We write all the time about the critical importance of cybersecurity practices and protocols such as multifactor authentication, employee training regarding phishing, and using secure passwords. The general consensus appears to be that the Twitter hack was not a sophisticated one, but that the hackers knew what they were after and knew how to accomplish their goal. The NYDFS report stated that “the Twitter Hack is a cautionary tale about the extraordinary damage that can be caused even by unsophisticated cybercriminals. The Hackers’ success was due in large part to weaknesses in Twitter’s internal cybersecurity protocols.”

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Secureworks issues an annual Incident Response Report that is very helpful in obtaining information on what types of incidents are occurring in order to become more resistant to threats. The 2020 IR Report was recently issued, and it contained some conclusions that made sense, while others were surprising.

The Report, entitled Pandemic-Driven Change: The Effect of COVID-19 on Incident Response, recognized that the pandemic has changed the way business is done “with organizations shifting to home-office work styles literally overnight.” Although there was a general assumption that with the transition from work in the office to work from home security incidents would increase, the Secureworks team found that the threat level was unchanged. What changed was the increase in new vulnerabilities that threat attackers took advantage of during the pandemic. According to the Report, “Infrastructure transformed practically overnight for many organizations. A sudden switch to remote work, increased use of cloud services, and increased reliance on personal devices created a significantly expanded attack surface for many enterprises. Facing an urgent need for business continuity, most companies did not have time to put all the necessary protocols, processes, and controls in place.”

In shifting rapidly from the office to workers’ homes, IT professionals were unable to strategize and implement necessary security controls because organizations did not plan for a totally remote workforce. The Report found that companies experienced increased risk in the following areas:

  • Lack of Multi-Factor Authentication
  • Access to SaaS Applications
  • VPN Split Tunneling
  • Security Monitoring and Access Control Implications
  • Delays in Security Patching

Additional increased risks outlined in the Report included allowing remote workers to use their personal devices without implementing a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) program, and heightened risk due to staffing changes.

These risk factors are not new, they have just become more pronounced during the pandemic. Threat actors used old tactics in a new environment to attack victims. According to the Report, “[A]dversaries simply pivoted their tactics to launch COVID19-themed campaigns, exploit the security gaps in remote work environments, and target organizations involved with pandemic research.” In addition, as we have reported before, attackers are using COVID-19 “as a phishing bait” as they understand that workers are looking for more information about COVID to protect themselves and their families and thus are not as vigilant because they are distracted and scared.

The Secureworks Report confirms that there are new vulnerabilities and old tricks to address during the pandemic with a fully-remote workforce